January 12, 2016 Ralph Smith 0Comment

Published January 11, 2016 Associated Press Facebook264 Twitter0 Email Print REUTERS/Enrique Castro-Mendivil WASHINGTON –  Mammograms do the most good later in life, a government task force declared Monday in recommending that women get one every other year starting at age 50. It said 40-somethings should make their own choice after weighing the pros and cons. When to start routine mammograms and how frequently to get them has long been controversial. The latest guidelines from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force stick with its advice that women should one every two years between ages 50 and 74. But they also make…

January 6, 2016 Ralph Smith 0Comment

Published January 06, 2016 Reuters Facebook0 Twitter0 livefyre Email Print Nov. 20, 2013: A U.S. Navy nurse stands next to a chair with restraints, used for force-feeding, and a tray displaying nutritional shakes, a tube for feeding through the nose, and lubricants, including a jar of olive oil, during a tour of the detainee hospital at Guantanamo Bay Naval Base in Cuba. (AP) The U.S. military should rescind directives that authorize health professionals to participate in interrogations and force-feedings, some medical ethicists argue. Responding to criticism from the medical community, the U.S. military recently cut back on use of psychologists…

January 5, 2016 Ralph Smith 0Comment

Published January 05, 2016 The Wall Street Journal Facebook1 Twitter0 livefyre Email Print (2006 Getty Images) Add another disease to the list of ailments that may be thwarted by regular aspirin use—prostate cancer. Researchers reported that men who took at least three aspirin tablets a week reduced their risk of developing or dying from advanced prostate cancer. The aspirin didn’t affect whether the men developed the disease to begin with, though. Separately, other scientists found what they described as early evidence that a government panel’s recommendation against routine prostate-cancer screening may be having an unwelcome result: an increase in detection…

December 28, 2015 Ralph Smith 0Comment

By Dr. Jennifer Landa Published December 28, 2015 FoxNews.com Facebook7 Twitter0 livefyre1 Email Print (iStock) Some people might say the obsession began with the hit Netflix original series “Orange is the New Black,” while others might argue that it was the debut of  “Breaking Bad” on the on-demand site that sparked the trend. Credit for igniting the spark matters little—millions of Americans are whiling away hours upon hours binge-watching TV, and they are potentially putting their health at risk in the process. Streaming TV and movies online has become a staple of modern culture. As of December 2015, four in…

December 23, 2015 Ralph Smith 0Comment

By Lacie Glover Published December 23, 2015 NerdWallet Facebook2 Twitter0 livefyre1 Email Print Light therapy is often doctors’ first-line treatment for seasonal affective disorder (SAD), or seasonal depression. (iStock) With changes in season come changes in mood — at least for an estimated 10 million Americans suffering from seasonal affective disorder, or SAD, which causes symptoms similar to those of depression. Why seasonal? As fall approaches, days get shorter, disrupting the natural circadian rhythm and causing many people to sleep poorly. And less exposure to sunlight during fall and winter months also affects levels of serotonin, a feel-good hormone, which…

December 21, 2015 Ralph Smith 0Comment

Published December 21, 2015 Associated Press Facebook0 Twitter0 livefyre0 Email Print (AP Photo/Charles Krupa) NEW YORK (AP) — This year’s flu season seems like old times. There’s not much flu going around so far – unlike the last three seasons when doctors’ offices were filled with patients before Christmas and illnesses peaked by late December. “It really is off to sort of a slow start” compared to that recent history, said Lynnette Brammer of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The CDC released its weekly flu count Friday. Only South Carolina is showing significant flu-related traffic at doctor’s offices…

December 18, 2015 Ralph Smith 0Comment

Published December 18, 2015 Reuters Facebook0 Twitter0 livefyre Email Print Rosalind Picard, MIT professor and chief scientist at Empatica, wears the company’s Embrace device while posing for a portrait at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Massachusetts November 25, 2015. REUTERS/Brian Snyder (Copyright Reuters 2015) Next CHICAGO –  A new wave of wearable computing devices that detect and monitor serious diseases is moving from the laboratory to the market, potentially transforming the treatment of conditions ranging from epilepsy to diabetes and creating business opportunities estimated to be worth tens of billions of dollars. Unlike popular fitness-tracking devices, such as…

October 28, 2015 Ralph Smith 0Comment

By Tanya Zuckerbrot Published October 28, 2015 FoxNews.com Facebook40 Twitter33 livefyre Email Print Go Natural Opt for natural or artisanal treats instead of mass marketed candy brands that are loaded with sugar, preservatives, artificial flavors and coloring, and hydrogenated oils that may contain unhealthy trans-fats. All-natural treats such as Justin’s Organic Nut Butter Cups and Cocomels Organic Caramels taste indulgent, but they are much kinder to your health. Curb Sugar Cravings Chase a serving of candy with a serving of a vegetable to keep sugar consumption in check. Added bonus: The fiber in vegetables helps soak up and eliminate some…

September 11, 2015 Ralph Smith 0Comment

Published September 10, 2015 Reuters Facebook1 Twitter1 Email Print  (Copyright Reuters 2015) Adults who get too much or too little sleep may have the beginnings of “hardening” of the arteries, which can be an early sign of heart disease, according to a new study. “Many people, up to one third or one fourth of the general population, suffer from inadequate sleep – either insufficient duration of sleep or poor quality of sleep,” said co-lead author Dr. Chan-Won Kim of Kangbuk Samsung Hospital of Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine in Seoul, South Korea. Several studies have linked inadequate sleep with an…

September 7, 2015 Ralph Smith 0Comment

By Jennifer Trainer Thompson Published September 08, 2015 FoxNews.com Facebook12 Twitter20 livefyre0 Email Print NOW PLAYINGFoods to battle macular degeneration Never autoplay videos Did you know that macular degeneration is the leading cause of legal blindness in people over 55 in the U.S.?  In the next ten years, the population of baby boomers over 55 will be six times greater than it was in 1990. In a mere decade, macular degeneration may reach epidemic proportions. So what exactly is macular degeneration? Basically, it is damage to the central part of your retina (the macula) caused by aging. Our macula is what allows us…